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More than one caracter set in one document.

 
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georgesgiralt
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 12:29 am    Post subject: More than one caracter set in one document. Reply with quote

Hi !
The context :
OpenOffice 2.2 used in a Fedora Core 7 computer.
The language is set to French (as I'm French Wink )
We need to create a writer document containing sentences writen in Devanagari (character set used for Indian languages : Hindi, Sanskit...) and text in plain occidental character set (ISO-8859-15).
I've installed the support for Hindi language, but I'm stuck, not knowing how to switch and how to type the correct letters (my keyboard is a French PC layout).
Any lead to the correct documentation/howto or help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks a lot in advance.
Regards
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Robert Tucker
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 1:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some instructions of mine for changing keyboard are at:

www.oooforum.org/forum/viewtopic.phtml?t=59639

You would, of course, select "India" for Devanagari.

Writer, by default, uses Unicode.

You can set the default document language at:

Tools>Options...>Language Settings>Languages

You should check "Enabled for complex text layout" and might select Hindi as the default CTL language.

You can also change language at:

Format/right-mouse click>Character...>Font

You may wish to consider setting up different styles for different languages (that is, the language can be part of the style).

Keyboards:

French

Code:

~ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 +
& ' ( - _ ) =
   A Z E R T Y U I O P
   a z e r t y u i o p ^ $
    Q S D F G H J K L M %
    q s d f g h j k l m *
   > W X C V B N ? . /
   < w x c v b n , ; : !


Devanagari

Code:

ऒ ऍ ॅ ३ ४ ५ ६ ७ ८ ( ) ः ऋ
ॊ १ २ ३ ४ ५ ६ ७ ८ ९ ० ः ृ
   औ ऐ आ ई ऊ भ ङ घ ध झ ढ ञ
   ौ ै ा ी ू ब ह ग द ज ड ़
    ओ ए अ इ उ फ ऱ ख थ छ ठ ऑ
    ो े ् ि ु प र क त च ट ॉ
    | ऎ ँ ण ऩ ऴ ळ श ष । ?
    \ ॆ ं म न व ल स , . य
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georgesgiralt
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's seems wondefull !
I'll report when I've tested this !
Thank you very much, Sir !
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georgesgiralt
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 5:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello !
It's working fine, execpt the "<" and ">" keys which are not working (maybe a hardware keyboard problem, as these keys do not work on a terminal).
We also need to add the Roman representation of Devanagari text, and for now, we are stuck. We have got a TTF font which is helpfull to get Web pages correctly displayed, the font shows on OpenOffice, but can't use it. Any clue ?
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georgesgiralt
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 5:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I forgot to ask : When you have an Unicode character value, how do you use it to insert the character into a document ?
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huwg
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's U+0FF (0255) or below, and your keyboard has a seperate number pad, you can hold down Alt and type the decimal value (including leading zero) on the number pad. The character will appear when you release the Alt key.

Edit: Sorry, I was under the impression that this was not Windows-specific, but Hagar's post below proves me wrong.

Otherwise see:
how to bind a key combination/stroke to a special character?


Last edited by huwg on Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:45 am; edited 1 time in total
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Hagar Delest
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

georgesgiralt wrote:
I forgot to ask : When you have an Unicode character value, how do you use it to insert the character into a document ?

Under Linux, there is the Unicode input method. Depends on your kernel.
Should be CTRL+SHIFT+U then type the hexadecimal code and hit space to change the code into the character. Or CTRL+SHIFT+ hex code (it is typed underlined then), the character appears after having typed the code (older kernels).
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georgesgiralt
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Guys !
The situation has evolved a lot.
We are able to type in a Writer's document some text in Devanagari, below it some text in Roman representation of the Devanagari, and below that some plain European text.
But sometimes, when you re-open the document, some characters (mainly into the European text) are not correctly displayed and are replaced by a = sign slashed, or another weird one. If you select the text and change the font, the display gets correct and returns to bad if you switch back the font.
Sometimes the display becomes good if you close and re-open the document, sometimes not.
Any clues ? Is it a bug ? or a "feature a la Microsof"t Wink
TIA !
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multi-lingual_ooo
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

georgesgiralt wrote:
If you select the text and change the font, the display gets correct and returns to bad if you switch back the font.


You have to create language specific styles. One set of styles for French. One set of styles for English. One set of styles of German. One set of styles for Hindi, One set of styles for Sanskrit. One set of styles for Urdu, etc.

Set the font for all three (Western, Asian, CTL) the same.
Set the language in the appropriate section.
Set the langauge of the other two sections to "None".

Remember to use the styles when creating your multilingual texts.

xan

jonathon
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http://oooauthors.org/en/members/tutorials/multilingualooo/
http://esnips.com/web/OOoRelatedThings/
http://esnips.com/web/GraphologyTools
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Hagar Delest
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't see why styles would have an impact on a font display issue. Why only some characters would be wrong ?

georgesgiralt, could you put some screenshots ? Are you saving as .doc (you're talking about MS) ?
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multi-lingual_ooo
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hagar de l'Est wrote:
I don't see why styles would have an impact on a font display issue. Why only some characters would be wrong ?


OOo tends to use the font for Western languages, when two or more languages are selected for the same style. By setting all three to the same font, even if it makes that error, it displays the correct glyph.

One other factor is that the entire Indic Valley Writing System section of Unicode is a mess. Font incompatibillity is par for the course. (I doubt that one can make a good pan-Indic Valley Writing System font.)

And fonts are an attribute of the style that is selected.

Going back to why only some characters are affected. In theory, OOo looks at the selected language, and displays only the glyphs in that Unicode subrange. If the font is correctly made, that isn't an issue. if it is badly made, that is an issue.

Good CJKV make themselves known by the slight differences it displays for the glyph, depending uponwehther the script is Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Vietnamese. Bad one's hide themselves, by not exhibiting that behaviour. (Baed fonts exhibit the expected behaviour.)

Bad Indic Valley Writing System fonts, OTOH, display themselves by not correctly creating the required glyphs. Good fonts display the expected behaviour. Since there are far more glyphs to mess up with Indic Valley writing systems, than with CKJV, poor quality fonts are far more visible in the former.

xan

jonathon
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One of the following might contain more details:

http://oooauthors.org/en/members/tutorials/multilingualooo/
http://esnips.com/web/OOoRelatedThings/
http://esnips.com/web/GraphologyTools
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